Time’s Up: Studying Leaderboards for Engaging Punctual Behaviour

by João P Costa, Rina R Wehbe, James Robb, Lennart E Nacke
Abstract:
In the workplace, an individual’s punctuality will not only have an effect on how a person is viewed by colleagues, but will also reverberate on their productivity. Being late for a meeting can be disruptive to the working team, costing everyone time and causing the individual to miss valuable information. Little has been done to improve the punctuali- ty of working teams. Therefore, we were interested in stud- ying the effectiveness of leaderboards, a common gamifica- tion technique, for improving punctuality of participants to regular work meetings. Leaderboards were comprised of data collected by monitoring the arrival times of the partici- pants, which influenced their scores in the leaderboards. We found that leaderboards themselves did not promote punc- tuality of every participant, but gave rise to various gameful social comparisons. These gameful social comparisons that emerged among participants when using leaderboards for our meetings were reported to be the cause of their punctu- ality improvements.
Reference:
Time’s Up: Studying Leaderboards for Engaging Punctual Behaviour (João P Costa, Rina R Wehbe, James Robb, Lennart E Nacke), In Proceedings of Gamification 2013, ACM, 2013.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{costa2013time,
abstract = {In the workplace, an individual’s punctuality will not only have an effect on how a person is viewed by colleagues, but will also reverberate on their productivity. Being late for a meeting can be disruptive to the working team, costing everyone time and causing the individual to miss valuable information. Little has been done to improve the punctuali- ty of working teams. Therefore, we were interested in stud- ying the effectiveness of leaderboards, a common gamifica- tion technique, for improving punctuality of participants to regular work meetings. Leaderboards were comprised of data collected by monitoring the arrival times of the partici- pants, which influenced their scores in the leaderboards. We found that leaderboards themselves did not promote punc- tuality of every participant, but gave rise to various gameful social comparisons. These gameful social comparisons that emerged among participants when using leaderboards for our meetings were reported to be the cause of their punctu- ality improvements.},
address = {Stratford, ON, Canada},
author = {Costa, Jo~{a}o P and Wehbe, Rina R and Robb, James and Nacke, Lennart E},
booktitle = {Proceedings of Gamification 2013},
organization = {ACM},
pages = {26--33},
publisher = {ACM},
title = {{Time’s Up: Studying Leaderboards for Engaging Punctual Behaviour}},
url = {http://www.researchgate.net/publication/257519212_Time's_Up_Studying_Leaderboards_For_Engaging_Punctual_Behaviour/file/e0b4952558a11dc085.pdf},
year = {2013}
}

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