Advent Calendar 2009

19 - What Can We Learn From Computer Games?

As a nat­ur­al fol­low-up to yesterday’s slide deck, we have Mary and Douglas Kiang’s pre­sen­ta­tion on dig­i­tal games for the body, mind and soul today. Their talk out­lines 21st Century skills expect­ed from this gen­er­a­tion, such as cre­ativ­i­ty, inno­va­tion, prob­lem-solv­ing, com­mu­ni­ca­tion, and col­lab­o­ra­tion. If that does not sound like the core activ­i­ties you do in your favorite game yet — the slides are going to per­suade you. Continue read­ing

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Advent Calendar 2009

18 - Why Video Games Are Good For You

It is crys­tal ball time again. This time we are talk­ing about the future of edu­ca­tion. The claim: Game design­ers = Teachers. The pre­sen­ter: Tim Hart. An instruc­tion­al or learn­ing tech­nol­o­gist at the University of Maine in the USA. His pre­sen­ta­tion (with the title prob­a­bly some­what inspired by Steven Johnson’s book “Everything Good is Bad for You”) is about the poten­tial of dig­i­tal games for learn­ing and edu­ca­tion. It is part­ly a rant, part­ly vision­ary. I find it well-craft­ed and com­pre­hen­sive. He begins by out­lin­ing a num­ber of good resources on his top­ic and starts talk­ing about the gen­er­a­tion V (the cur­rent­ly 5-year-olds) and their expec­ta­tion of the future edu­ca­tion sys­tem. Kids that will live and breathe Microsoft Project Natal, brows­er games, the Zii (or Cii, Bii, Oii, Yii as it is spec­u­lat­ed), min­gle with friends in the next Facebook and PlayStation Home, and expect all movies to have the lev­el of sophis­ti­ca­tion that Avatar is cur­rent­ly show­ing. On slide 30, he has a car­toon ques­tion­ing whether we should be teach­ing our kids the old-fash­ioned way it is often still done. Continue read­ing

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